unfinished business




COLE. Twenty-One. Female. Melbourne, Australia.


We have all the time in the world
to get it right.
We have all the love in the world
to set alight.

Hill and I made MONKEY BREAD. American concoction that tastes like a cake made of warm cinnamon donuts and caramel. 

#bakingwithhill #hillisaplaceinourhearts #monkeybread #ileftmyheartintexas

Hill and I made MONKEY BREAD. American concoction that tastes like a cake made of warm cinnamon donuts and caramel.

#bakingwithhill #hillisaplaceinourhearts #monkeybread #ileftmyheartintexas

#hillisaplaceinourhearts #bakingwithhill #monkeybread #ileftmyheartintexas

equiuszahhak:

BEWARE: smoking weed can have dangerous side effects, such as never shutting the fuck up about the fact you smoke weed

that feel when

17yr:

you really need roll on body glitter but it isnt sold in stores anymore

You’re going to the wrong stores

Sometimes I just miss acting so god damn much.

kingdom-dance:

look at all those chickens 

i taggggggggg

duneekah, kittykitpanda, indianasjones, shannonelizabeththefirst, heyitshawkguy, and pleaselookaftermyghost and if you wanna do this shit i tag you too ok

before I do this later let’s talk about how dangerously attractive my pal Britney is gross

#britney is a princess #perf #Voitel #miss you too much my California kitten

kuunakullanvalkeana:

tbh, i find the emergence of the concept of demisexuality very interesting, and i’m partial to thinking it’s a symptom of hypersexualized patriarchal culture that demands full sexual availability of women. wanting to develop an emotional bond before having sex is actually a very common and even normative thing, yet nowadays women seem to be under so much pressure to have casual sex that they strongly identify with demisexuality to justify the limits of their sexual comfort zone.

i wonder how the idea that not wanting to have sex with people you don’t know well needs its own label might be connected with the “sex-positive” movement and its ideas of “sexual empowerment”. we’ve conceptualized being sexual (as opposed to “half-sexual”) in very strict terms and reached a point where certain sexual behaviours, such as casual sex, are not just seen as normal and accepted but actually positioned as a required part of “full” sexuality, and by doing that we’ve abnormalized not wanting to have sex with people you don’t know well, which is alarming because there is an immense pressure on women to be sexually available to men.

#real talk
#how is this so relevant
fullcravings:

Gingerdoodles

Toombaworth ↘

People keep asking me. Here it is. Finally off the festival circuit and available to view freely online, my favourite project I’ve ever worked on - Toombaworth.

#me #tayla #arielle #toombaworth #loose tooth productions #bogan #short film #none of the actors like the final takes used but it's still VERY well-made #and the awards show that :)

saltwaterhours:

Did you know you can work out without updating every social media outlet? Truly amazing! What a world to live in!

notafuckingwizard :
There is one healthy reason to lose weight: your doctor says "you have a particularly high risk of X and the most effective way to minimise that risk is by doing these things which will reduce your weight." But I stress: a doctor, not an advertiser or nosy relative.

woundedbydust1331:

smashasomebox:

yes, and that doctor should do whatever they can to make sure you have the tools and education to healthily get there.

also, doctors are also people and are often subject to the same biases around weight as society (despite being trained to know better) so unfortunately some of them will spout weight loss garbage without making sure their patient is actually in good health while doing so.

A+ post, but I’m also going to add that even in circumstances like this one, there are healthy and unhealthy ways to lose weight. For instance, if your doctor says “you need to lose weight because it increases the risk of x condition which you are predisposed to,” that’s all well and good. If you achieve this through exercise and generally treating your body with respect (without becoming obsessive etc) then that’s fine and healthy. But if you respond to that by severely restricting your calorie intake to the extent where it interferes with your ability to function, or do some ridiculous fad diet like only drinking juice for 60 days, then it is unhealthy. Unhealthy weight loss strategies are unhealthy, no matter what weight you are. That’s it. Any weight you lose for “health” is completely shallow and tokenistic if you are damaging your body and mind in the process.

I wish people could understand this, but we’re so saturated in diet culture and have internalised so much false, toxic bull shit that the idea that thin =/= health seems ridiculous to a good deal of society. And it’s hurting us.

Susannah used the key word I need to post about this - tokenistic.

Weight loss for the sake of weight loss alone is never healthy. The medical conditions which people keep saying are a reason for “healthy weight loss” due to their risk supposedly increasing due to obesity alone aren’t that simple.
Obesity may be an indicator of unhealthy lifestyle patterns and behaviours. It is those behaviours that increase the risk of medical conditions (and the original weight gain).
A lifestyle change to improve your health (for example, being a little more active every day, drinking less alcohol, eating more vegetables) may INCIDENTALLY cause weight loss.
If you are treating your body with respect, balance and aiming for health - for your body to function as effectively and happily as possible - your natural body weight will come.
If that natural body weight is still a high BMI (ugh BMI) - fuck it. Stay at that weight. Be happy and healthy. Weight and size/shape is not an inherent indicator of health.
However if your pure aim is weight loss alone, literally losing kilograms by whatever means possible, your aim is clearly not optimising health.

#rant #waiting for someone to pick apart the 2 words i used wrong to justify the bullshit society has taught them

"We are prescribing for fat people what we diagnose as disordered eating in thin people."

- Deb Burgard, keynote at the 2011 NAAFA conference (via smashasomebox)